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Finding Answers as Fitness Enthusiasts Demand More from Workouts

by User Not Found | Mar 29, 2012
Just as consumers demand high performance from their computers, phones and vehicles, fitness enthusiasts want more out of their workouts. The trend of high-performance conditioning took center stage during a ‘Hot Topics Forum’ at the American College of Sports Medicine’s 16th annual Health & Fitness Summit & Exposition.

March 29, 2012

FINDING ANSWERS AS FITNESS ENTHUSIASTS DEMAND MORE FROM WORKOUTS
Panel addresses hot topics related to the trend of high-performance conditioning

 

LAS VEGAS – Just as consumers demand high performance from their computers, phones and vehicles, fitness enthusiasts want more out of their workouts. The trend of high-performance conditioning took center stage during a ‘Hot Topics Forum’ at the American College of Sports Medicine’s 16th annual Health & Fitness Summit & Exposition.

 

“The fitness industry is currently experiencing a surge of interest and growth in high-intensity interval training and conditioning,” said panel moderator Len Kravitz, Ph.D. a researcher and coordinator of exercise science at the University of New Mexico. “It’s important for fitness professionals to understand the dietary requirements and variety of training programs to safely and effectively meet their clients’ needs.”

 

Other experts joining Kravitz on the panel included Nanna L. Meyer, Ph.D., R.D., CSSD, from the University of Colorado & United States Olympic Committee; Michael R. Bracko, Ed.D, CSCS, FACSM, a sports physiologist and fitness educator for the Institute for Hockey Research; and Brad Schoenfeld, president of Global Fitness Services.

 

The panel discussed the following issues on the topic:

  • The latest scientific and practical advice on how to eat to build strength and power and increase energy
  • The pros and cons of interval training versus endurance training
  • The cardiovascular, skeletal muscle, and metabolic adaptations to high-intensity interval training versus continuous endurance exercise
  • The manipulation of training variables such as volume, load lifted and muscle actions to build muscle and the specialized techniques that work best for these adaptations to occur.

 

BACKGROUND

ACSM recommends that a fitness professional take into account the physical limitations of each participant in a group or individual setting, which allows a relatively low-risk program based on health status and goals. Special consideration should be given to matters such as incorporating proper rest following high-intensity sessions, using proper form, and minimizing practices that increase risk for injury. It is important that the training be scaled appropriately to the individual.

 

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The American College of Sports Medicine is the largest sports medicine and exercise science organization in the world. More than 45,000 international, national and regional members and certified professionals are dedicated to advancing and integrating scientific research to provide educational and practical applications of exercise science and sports medicine. NOTE: Information presented at the Summit represents the professional opinions of the presenters and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the American College of Sports Medicine.

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