Brown Bag Series in Science: Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs: Mortality, Mind and Muscle
Menu

In This Section:

Brown Bag Series in Science: Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs: Mortality, Mind and Muscle

Oct 11, 2019

Brown Bag Series in Science: Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs: Mortality, Mind and Muscle
Thursday, October 24  |  12:00 p.m. ET

ACSM’s Brown Bag Series in Science gives students an opportunity to learn more about the diverse scientific work ACSM members conduct. Sign up for this informal discussion to hear more about what ACSM members study, the general research methodology they use and some of the interesting results of their research.

In this month's presentation, ACSM Fellow Beth Taylor, PhD, will be discussing her research examining the effects of statins on skeletal muscle strength and aerobic performance, the effects of Coenyme Q10 supplementation on skeletal muscle side effects, and cognitive side effects of statins assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging. 

Presenter:

Fellow Beth Taylor, PhD, FACSM
Associate Professor, Institute for Collaboration on Health Intervention, and Policy
University of Connecticut

Dr. Taylor is an Associate Professor of Kinesiology at University of Connecticut as well as the Director of Exercise Physiology Research at Hartford Hospital. Her research interests focus on interactions between exercise, aging, cardiovascular disease, and commonly used cardiovascular medications. She has been a principal or co-investigator on several NIH-funded projects involving the pleiotropic effects of statin therapy (cholesterol-lowering drugs) in humans. These projects include investigation of the direct effects of statins on skeletal muscle strength and aerobic performance, the effects of Coenzyme Q10 supplementation on skeletal muscle side effects, and cognitive side effects of statins assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging. With funding from the American Heart Association she is now investigating novel mechanisms to detect statin-associated muscle symptoms so as to improve tolerance and effectiveness of statin drugs. She has also recently been studying the effect of aerobic exercise training on brain volumes and memory function in individuals at risk of Alzheimers Disease. An avid runner herself, Taylor has conducted studies at the Boston and Hartford Marathons to determine the effects of sustained endurance exercise on blood clot risk, markers of cardiovascular injury and stress, and the effects of cholesterol-lowering drugs on these biomarkers.

We hope you can join us!

Unable to watch the webinar live? Register anyway, and you will receive a link to the recorded version afterward.


Register