Sports Medicine Bulletin
Menu

In This Section:

ACSM's Sports Medicine Bulletin

Sports Medicine Bulletin (SMB) is a weekly news and information resource from the American College of Sports Medicine. 

SMB features include:

  • Active Voice
  • Science Spotlight
  • ACSM in the News
  • Important member information
  • ACSM happenings 

Recent news from SMB 

As ACSM's weekly news and information resource, SMB aims to to call attention to key information pertaining to all members. Last month, beloved ACSM Past President Charles M. "Tip" Tipton, Ph.D., FACSM, passed away at age 93. ACSM extends its deepest condolences to the family, friends and former colleagues and students of Tip.

Charles TiptonTip was a beloved ACSM member and had a long and distinguished career in exercise physiology, serving the profession and ACSM for more than 50 years. Tip joined ACSM in 1963. He quickly became an active member and shared his expertise on the Board of Trustees and several committees including: Publications, Nominating, Budget and Finance and Organizational Ethics, among many others. Tip served as ACSM’s 18th president from 1974-75. Under his leadership, ACSM authored its first position stand and prepared to move to national prominence. To date, Tip remains among a select group to be honored with both the Citation Award (1979) and the Honor Award (1986).

Tip contributed to more than 150 scientific publications; authored the History of Exercise Physiology; presented at numerous conferences and held multiple academic appointments. He established a B.S. in exercise and sport sciences at the University of Iowa in the mid-1980s, which later served as a template for a B.S. in physiology. Tip also worked with the ACSM Foundation to establish the Charles M. Tipton Student Research Award to recognize student research and provide financial assistance to participate in the ACSM Annual Meeting.

So many ACSM members were mentored by Tip or inspired by his enthusiasm, passion and example as a lifelong learner. ACSM Fellow Bob Oppliger, Ph.D., fondly recalls Tip’s influence.

“As a non-traditional grad student, I am grateful that Tip offered me the opportunity to join his lab at Iowa as a walk-on. One of the traits he valued and cultivated among his students was critical thinking and the willingness to challenge the status quo. So, as a rookie, when without raising my hand, I abruptly voiced disagreement with data on one of his slides in a 7:30 a.m. exercise physiology class, it aroused the other 30 or so students, as well as Tip. Recognizing a teaching moment and accepting the challenge, he stopped his lecture and engaged me in dialog for several minutes. In retrospect, I think it was one of the ways I gained his respect and created a rapport that continued over the next 40 years when he’d greet me with, ‘Oppliger are you in trouble?’ Tip will be missed by all of us who knew him.”

You can learn more about Tip’s life, career and legacy in:

More from SMB